How a Therapist Can Help After Trauma

By Michael Robinson

Therapy provides a safe and confidential place for a person to talk to a professional about personal experiences, thoughts, feelings, or problems. People who go to therapy may have experienced a situation that disrupts and/or impacts his or her thinking, mood, feelings, or ability to relate to others. In other words, some sort of TRAUMA. A person may also seek out therapy because they want a neutral and safe place to talk about trauma and traumatic events in their life. Many people seek out therapy adults, youth, teens, even therapists themselves. Everyone needs somewhere they feel safe and supported. A place to begin the healing process from life’s traumas.

The Role of the Therapist

The role of the therapist is to help the person understand their situation, teach strategies to express themselves and cope with potentially stressful situations due to traumatic events. The therapist can also offer the individual or family tools to help them manage difficult feelings, and/or negative thoughts and behaviors.

A therapist skilled in working with people suffering from trauma can be beneficial to anyone who has experienced a traumatic event . By engaging in trauma-focused treatment, one can learn more about what they are experiencing,how to address the concerns, and develop healthier ways of coping with the traumas. The role of the therapist is to help people understand their situation, teach strategies to express him or herself, and cope with potentially stressful situations.

Your therapist can also offer the individual or family tools to help them manage difficult feelings, and or negative thoughts, feelings and behaviors. There is no magical treatment that will heal you overnight, nor is there one form of psychotherapy that is right for everyone, but you should be able to find a therapist that is skilled at working with people suffering from trauma. They should also have a good therapeutic approach to trauma. Healing is like a marathon. It requires preparation, repeated practice, courage, determination, and the support of others, including that of a professional coach or trained therapist.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy or (CBT) is grounded in the idea that an individual must correct and change incorrect thoughts and increase knowledge and skills. Common elements of (CBT) trauma therapy include teaching individuals breathing techniques in order to help manage their anxiety and stress caused by traumatic events. Also educating individuals on normal reactions to trauma as well as identifying and evaluating negative , incorrect and irrational thoughts and replacing them with more accurate and much less negative thoughts. If you are ready to learn more about how a therapist can help you navigate a trauma, you can contact our office at 212-433-2384 or info@parkavenuepsychotherapy.com.